Tuesday, March 09, 2010

Looking under the books

Unlike most of our public university rivals, BC is not under any obligation to share employee salaries. However, the salaries can't stay private forever, as Bob Hohler showed in Tuesday's Globe. According to federal tax returns, during the 2007-08 season Al Skinner made $2.2 million dollars. The salary made him BC's highest paid employee and doubled Jags' 2007-2008 salary of $1.1 million. BC nor Skinner's agent was willing to explain how the compensation package worked. The Globe implies that there were probably some unique one-time bonuses related to Al's then new contract and the move to the ACC. Regardless, this shows BC is more than competitive with our rivals when it comes to compensation.

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35 Comments:

At 9:08 AM, Blogger JC said...

I heard he got a huge tax break by trading in all the timeouts he has saved up.

 
At 9:50 AM, Blogger ObserverCollege said...

As if the awful destruction in Cameron wasn't enough, now we see yet another obstacle God has put in front of our modern-day Job, Coach Roy Williams. First Coach Roy brings in a disappointing recruiting class. Then a student from Presbyterian College(!) has the TEMERITY to BOO inside the Dean Dome??? Then Coach Williams gets crucified for merely pointing out that, you know, Haiti isn't HIS life. Just as Haiti was a catastrophe for those who live there, so is this season a catastrophe for him. Now I read this article and declare: et tu, Al Skinner, et tu???

How is Roy Williams supposed to compete? When Al Skinner has an Eastern Clothing of Watertown slush fund percolating through Boston College, where exactly is the NCAA? Hasn't Coach Williams suffered enough? How is he supposed to bear up in the wake of such Biblical suffering? When even a program like Boston College beats his North Carolina, we understand that God is trying to prove a point. Well I, for one, stand with Coach Roy Williams. Enough, Boston College. Enough, God. Let Roy Williams be Roy Williams!!!

 
At 11:37 AM, Blogger Ry said...

the thought of an Eastern Clothing of Watertown slush fund is almost too funny to comprehend.

JC - nice one

 
At 11:42 AM, Blogger Claver2010 said...

Talk about bang for your buck!

 
At 11:46 AM, Blogger Erik said...

So BC's Carroll School of Management received a #9 ranking in the latest Business Week rankings of Top Undergraduate Business Programs. Congrats Eagles! Hopefully Mike Siravo is updating his pitch accordingly.

CSOM'ers - Let us rejoice and be glad.

Arts & Science people.... uh, you can philosophize about it, or write a dissertation on why companies prefer a liberal arts education to concrete skills.

BusinessWeek

 
At 12:00 PM, Blogger Erik said...

(I keeed I keeed)

 
At 12:32 PM, Blogger Galvin said...

Pish posh Erik. You may put that rankings-feather in your cap all you like, but we A&S people can sleep well at night knowing that we are more thoughtful and creative... and have a better grasp of syntax... and, ah crap. Congrats all you CSOM nerds.

 
At 1:40 PM, Blogger DustBowl said...

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At 2:39 PM, Blogger DustBowl said...

I always found the CSOM crowd to be a soulless crowd -- lacking spirit and spirituality....poor bastards

 
At 3:24 PM, Blogger Ry said...

as an a&s grad, be sure there are plenty of buttheads to be found in both schools

won't say a bad word about the nurses and teachers though

 
At 3:27 PM, Blogger blist said...

Erik -- I had read somewhere - (sadly I do not have a link) - that the most common college major of most Fortune 1000 CEOs is English. The biz skool folks are good for middle management though (I also keed about the end bit)
We're clearly all fools for not taking up bball coaching.

 
At 3:48 PM, Blogger DustBowl said...

blist -- you got it right.

i always thought it a pity that these seemly bright CSOM kids were studying accounting rules (1 bean here, 2 beans there), or principles of organizations, while the rest of us were letting our imagination soar with English, or calculus, or organic chemistry or history.

but it does take a particular breed to give up one's youth in favor of learning about spreadsheets and what not

 
At 3:51 PM, Blogger DustBowl said...

blist -- econ, not english was the best major to be a CEO:

"It is often suggested that Economics is a good major for individuals interested in becoming business leaders. Despite this widespread assertion, little research has been conducted on this topic. Using the Standard and Poor (S&P) 500 companies, this paper examines the validity of such a claim. We find evidence that Economics is a good choice of major for those aspiring to become a CEO. Economics ranked third with 9% of the CEOs of the S&P 500 companies in 2004 being undergraduate Economics majors, behind Business Administration and Engineering majors, each of which accounted for 20% of the CEOs. When adjusting for size of the pool of graduates, those with undergraduate degrees in Economics are shown to have had a greater likelihood of becoming an S&P 500 CEO than any other major. That is, the share of graduates who were Economics majors who were CEOs in 2004 was greater than that for any other major, including Business Administration and Engineering. The findings also show that a higher percentage of CEOs who were Economics majors subsequently completed a graduate degree - often an MBA - than did their counterparts with Business Administration and Engineering degrees. The paper demonstrates that while women now comprise over half of all bachelors and masters degrees awarded, they remain a minority in terms of undergraduate degrees awarded in Economics and in MBA degrees conferred. Economics programs may try to appeal to more women students as a stepping stone to becoming a CEO, especially as women continue to account for less than 2 percent of the S&P 500 CEOs. "

 
At 3:54 PM, Blogger blist said...

Bummer. Honestly, I probably read the thing 10 years ago. The bias of seeing only what you want to, I guess.

 
At 10:53 PM, Blogger eagleboston said...

Erik,

You need to thank us A & S folks who are running legitimate Main Street businesses. After all, we bailed your CSOM asses out when you f'ed up Wall Street with your subprime mortgages. You would all be under water if not for us hard-working Joe's selling tangible products.

Signed,

History Major

 
At 2:55 AM, Blogger Bo said...

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At 2:59 AM, Blogger Ryan said...

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At 3:00 AM, Blogger Ryan said...

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At 3:02 AM, Blogger Ryan said...

Since when does being in CSOM mean we can't "let our imagination soar"? I'm pretty sure we're allowed to take classes out of the business school, not that you'd know because A&S kids are barely allowed to step foot within Fulton.

Trust me, I've taken plenty of A&S classes and have marveled at how easy they are compared to anything within CSOM, outside of marketing.

 
At 10:05 AM, Blogger DustBowl said...

ryan -- I noticed that it took you three takes to actually post your snarky remark. This suggests that your confidence exceeds your abilities.

 
At 10:45 AM, Blogger Karen said...

There are easy classes and intellectually rigorous classes in both schools. Why does one have to be better or more challenging than the other? It's a useless pissing contest. I am proud of my A&S BA but even more so that my degree is from BC.

 
At 11:02 AM, Blogger DustBowl said...

Karen -- so serious, aren't you!

But the comments are not meant to be serious at all ... just some blogging banter...

lighten up.

and, please there is no need for potty talk.

 
At 11:18 AM, Blogger Ryan said...

Yes, my remark is snarky but not yours about how everyone in CSOM is an intellectually-stunted phillistine. Save the holier-than-thou attitude for the NFP board you serve on.

 
At 11:44 AM, Blogger DustBowl said...

c'mon Ryan you gotta admit that the CSOM crowd was a dull, unimaginative group of bean counters (except when it came to counting beans).

Now please slowly remove that stick from your ......

 
At 12:00 PM, Blogger Ryan said...

You speak like someone who knew very few CSOM kids. Rest assured that we have plenty of fun, although it isn't the Quidditch-in-the-Dustbowl fun so many of the A&S nerds are fond of.

(stick now removed)

 
At 12:07 PM, Blogger Alex L. said...

Hold on there, Ryan. I was A&S and had at least 2 classes in Fulton from what I can remember. And yes, most CSOM majors are soulless people who are just in it for the money. And I regret not being in CSOM every day.

 
At 12:18 PM, Blogger Galvin said...

Almost all my friends were CSOM nerds. The Big 4 is stocked to the brim with them. I liked them very much and still do! Great bunch of guys, even if they are auditor and accountant geeks. Now, my A&S buddies, they are also way cool. The great thing about BC is the substantial number of good people it seems to attact (of course there are always the d-bags in each program). To be honest, I think the most difficult classes for a college kid are the science classes. I was a history major myself (individually easy) and watched my CSOM friends take a lot of finance/accounting classes ("collaberatively" easy). The science guys seemed to have it the worst - everything is on you and that is major memorization. Let's just be glad we are BC grads and that we are better than everyone else. haha!

 
At 12:35 PM, Blogger DustBowl said...

yes, ryan i had lots of csom friends; yes they are not all bad; yes, there are some fun people there.

But I guess I just object to having a trade school (i.e. csom) as part of the university. :~)

I remember CSOM used to have a course "Behavior In Organizations" where students would actually learn how to manage each body movement of a worker on an assembly line. hideous!

 
At 1:02 PM, Blogger Ryan said...

I agree that BC attracts great people and am proud of everyone who graduates from here, so we can agree on that.

Viewing CSOM as a trade school (as if that's a bad thing, how's it working out for schools like UVA, UPenn, Michigan...?) is completely wrong though. We take the same university core that everyone else in A&S takes. Each and every requirement. Look on the BC website if you don't believe me. I'm an accounting major because I like having a job, but I'm also an English major because I enjoy studying literature. It doesn't mean I'm a soulless person just because I choose to graduate with a tangible skill for the 50k per year I pay.

 
At 1:41 PM, Blogger DustBowl said...

ryan -- are you still a student?

i am pulling your leg for pete's sake!

 
At 1:56 PM, Blogger Erik said...

The one thing I've learned here, is that all 2,000 CSOM students are exactly the same person as the other 1,999; and all 6,000 A&S students are exactly like the 5,999 other A&S students; and no A&S student is like any CSOM students.

I'm happy we got that figured out.

 
At 1:57 PM, Blogger Ryan said...

Good God, I've been had! I should go study satire.

(bows out in shame)

 
At 3:21 PM, Blogger Ry said...

who knew there was such repressed animosity between a&s and csom? you would never know it on campus, but maybe people get angrier when they leave.

 
At 3:22 PM, Blogger K said...

I'm not getting into the CSOM vs. A&S argument (I have my feelings) but to besmirch having a "trade" school be part of BC...you are doing a great disservice to BC's great nursing and teaching schools. Combined these two schools may be more in line with being Men and Women for Others.

 
At 3:42 PM, Blogger DustBowl said...

i think if BC had a professional sports trainer degree in the nursing school -- a kind of nurse, i guess -- BC could admit a lot of athletes in there who might have an interest in sports trainer-ing.

However, this would hurt the sociology department.

 

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